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        "Truly great place to work"
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Best Practice - Truly great place to work

 

 

On balance, is your organisation...

 

a "truly great place to work?"

Best Practice routinely asks respondents whether or not their organisation is a "truly great place to work".

We have found that this one simple question gives a high-level indicator to the overall health of an organisation.

A high rating for this question typically means: Unit Cohesion in the Workplace

On average, 70% of employees who answer YES to this question will include 1 or more of the following 4 words in their reason - Staff – Friend - People – Team. Employees therefore rate an organisation as a “truly great place to work” in terms of the people with whom they work … not in terms of their job or their pay.

This is an excellent measure of the extent to which employees feel a sense of belonging to a friendly, cohesive community.

A low rating for this question typically means: Alienation in the Workplace

On average, 70% of employees who answer NO to this question will point to a LACK of something in the organisation, e.g. Support - Leadership – Morale – Communication.
They increasingly point to the things that are missing in the connections they have with the people they work with, the managers they work for, and the organisation that employs them.

This indicates a growing sense of disconnection or alienation from others in their workplace and, by implication, from the organisation’s purposes and goals.

The following chart looks at a range of over 200 organisations and compares
each organisation's truly great place to work rating with
its Employee Turnover Risk (defined as the percentage of
employees who often think of leaving the organisation).

Best Practice - Employee turnover versus social cohesion

Conclusion:

As Unit Cohesion in a workplace breaks down (and the level of employee alienation increases) … then the risk of high employee turnover will increase too. Organisations that are positioned in the lower right-hand quadrant can reduce their risk of employees leaving by adopting change management strategies that promote Unit Cohesion.

 

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